roasted peppers purée

If you opened up my freezer, you will always find a Ziploc bag of ice-cube sized portions of roasted peppers purée. I add roasted peppers purée to all sorts of recipes: soups, stirfry, panini sandwiches, sauces, the list goes on and on. It acts as a great substitute for tomato in a lot of recipes; I find that I am often sensitive to tomatoes and can only have them very infrequently and only certain ways.

So, on an evening or weekend when you find yourself content at home, try this out and enjoy the flavourful benefits in your baking over the next month or two.

All the ingredients you need are peppers — red, orange, yellow, green, any will do — you can often buy bags of them at the local produce market that are quite ripe and needing to be used in cooked dishes vs. eaten raw. Take advantage of that deal, those peppers are perfect for our purposes!

peppers1

Cut and seed all the peppers and wedge them into a baking dish (or two) and cover with tinfoil. While you’re doing this, preheat your oven to around 350°F. I use a Pyrex dish and have never added oil or liquid, and the peppers have never stuck.

Roast them until they are limp and thoroughly cooked. Remove them from the oven and let them cool.

As soon as you are able to touch them without scalding off your fingerprints, peel off the skin from each piece of pepper; the skin is like cellophane. Place the peeled peppers and the juices from roasting into a blender or food processor — purée.

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Use a small spoon to scoop the purée into ice cube trays and place them in your freezer. Within the next day or so, pop them out of the trays and into a Freezer Ziploc bag; they last a couple of months. However, I think you will find that you use them up before you have a problem with freezer burn.

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Now you have a secret stash of goodness that will add flavourful and nutritional dimension to whatever you are cooking.